‘We embrace this’

‘We embrace this’

Bubble Room to be featured on Food Network television series

Published in the Island Reporter June 24, 2015

A few months ago a director, producer and food stylist spent 10 and a half hours filming every nook and cranny of the Bubble Room Restaurant for a new show on Food Network, “Craziest Restaurant in America.”

“They shot every inch of this place,” Bubble Room Manager Stephen Peach said, adding that they also talked to many customers and their staff.

The Food Network contacted the Bubble Room and asked if they were interested in being featured on the television series, which he said they could not turn down.

Bubble Room Restaurant Manager Stephen Peach and General Manager Rachel Peach.

Bubble Room Restaurant Manager Stephen Peach and General Manager Rachel Peach.

The restaurant was approached for their orange crunch cake, a yellow cake layered with an almond brown sugar crunch with orange cream cheese icing and bubble bread.

“Of course we accepted,” he said. “It’s nice to get attention to our area. It’s another opportunity to get us noticed. The island is built on tourism . . . the more the better.”

Rachel Peach, Bubble Room general manager said it was a really cool experience having the filming crew at the restaurant.

“It happened really quick . . . within two weeks (they were) here shooting,” she said after they received the initial phone call.

The series, “Craziest Restaurant in America,” which is hosted by Graham Elliot has already aired three shows “Too Hot To Handle;” “Eat at Your Own Risk” and “Big, Bigger, Biggest.”

The Bubble Room will be one of five restaurants featured in the “Weird, Weirder, Weirdest” episode airing at 10 p.m. Wednesday, June 24.

“We embrace this,” Stephen said of the “Weird, Weirder, Weirdest” themed episode.

He said a food stylist made their three dishes orange crunch cake, bubble bread and the some like it hot shrimp dish look pretty for the episode.

“Everything was perfectly placed,” Stephen said.

He said they wanted to add the staff’s favorite dish, some like it hot shrimp, because it’s a seafood dish that offers an “islandy” appeal with its tropical fruit.

Although the couple does not know how they rank among the top five restaurants, Stephen said they have seen some commercial’s advertising the episode, which features one of their servers lighting the flaming cheese with a chicken hat on his head.

Katie Gardenia opened the Bubble Room 36 years ago with 24 seats. Rachel said Gardenia lived on the top floor and the restaurant was located on the bottom floor.

“Slowly the Bubble Room kicked them out of their house,” Rachel said because of its popularity.

Now the restaurant has 156 seats on three floors.

Rachel said the Bubble Room is returning to its original roots with the help of Gardenia. She said Gardenia recently came back and did the artwork for their menu, which now features six new dinner items, as well as helped in redecorating the 1930’s Macy’s display room featuring Santa’s workshop.

“We enjoy having her in and around the building,” Rachel said, adding that it’s been a cool experience to get to know Gardenia and hear about the Bubble Room’s history and the island.

‘It bloomed and I was hooked’

Exotic orchid blooms on Sanibel

Published in the Sanibel-Captiva Islander June 17, 2015 issue

The coryanthes cacrantha orchid, which has a nickname of the "bucket orchid."

The coryanthes cacrantha orchid, which has a nickname of the “bucket orchid.”

Joe Salatino was pleasantly surprised last Wednesday morning when he walked outside and noticed his exotic orchid in bloom for the first time since planting it more than a month ago.

The coryanthes cacrantha orchid, which has a nickname of the "bucket orchid."

The coryanthes cacrantha orchid, which has a nickname of the “bucket orchid.”

The Sanibel resident found a grower in northern California after researching the coryanthes cacrantha orchid, which has a nickname of the “bucket orchid,” online. He said he wanted to take a chance and see if he could get it to grow.

The bucket orchid is a native of South America and has a scent similar to licorice.

“This is the most complex, interesting and beautiful orchid I have ever seen, or grown,” Salatino said.

Joe Salatino holds his bucket orchid.

Joe Salatino holds his bucket orchid.

Once the flowers bloomed, an euglossini bee, which is green in color, began flying in and around the “bucket orchid.”

“It opened and the bees started showing up and pollinating,” he said.

While living in southern California in the 1960s, Salatino used to drive past an orchid greenhouse with a sign that read “exotic orchids of the world.”

One day he finally decided to stop and the owner showed him around the greenhouse that expanded more than an acre and explained every orchid to him.

Six months later he returned to the greenhouse and stumbled across the cattleya orchid.

“I was stunned of how beautiful the orchid is,” Salatino said.

He was given instructions of where to place the orchid in his apartment, as well as how to water and take care of the flower.

“It bloomed and I was hooked,” Salatino said.

Soon after purchasing his first orchid, he came across a book that read “welcome to a journey that many people begin and few finish,” on the front sleeve.

His journey continued in Dallas, Texas, with more than 1,000 plants in his greenhouse. Salatino now has 175 plants on Sanibel at his home. He designed an outdoor space that fits into the environment where the orchids either hang or sit on a table.

Salatino said a lot of the orchids have different needs, some which are specific nutritional needs. A number of his orchids are kept shaded with a fan pointing on them because they strive better in cooler environments.

Once the orchid is placed in the best climate, Salatino said you can pretty much leave them alone.

“I love to find exotic orchids that are challenging to raise and get them to bloom,” he said.

The hobby that began in 1975 has brought a tremendous amount of joy to Salatino and his family and friends.

“It’s a wonderful hobby to share,” he said.

Salatino is a member of the American Orchid Society, Sanibel-Captiva Orchid Society and Southwest Florida Orchid Society. While living in Texas, he won many awards for his orchids and provided speeches to further educate others about the flower.

“Orchid people are pleasant and we have a mutual love for these plants,” Salatino said. “It’s a very peaceful hobby.”

“We could have a substantial impact”

When people come together anything is possible. This article shares a glimpse of that.

______________________________________________________________________________________________

On June 12, 2014 I received an incredibly sweet email from Bryan Newman, a gentleman I interviewed for the article:

Thank you so very much for writing a great article of the Risen Savior Spring Food Drive. I don’t know how it could have been better.

You were a joy to work with and I hope we will have the opportunity to do so again. I will be sure to contact you the next time we provide a

noteworthy service within the Chandler community. On behalf of all of us at Risen Savior Church & School, thanks again.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

Risen Savior collects, donates 3.6 tons of food

Published in SanTan Sun News June 7, 2014 issue

Risen Savior Lutheran Church and School’s four-week food drive yielded 3.6 tons of food for the Chandler Christian Community Center’s Chandler Food Bank and the congregation is deeming the community outreach program a success.

“Knowing that there are some in the Chandler area that struggle to even put food on the table while our cupboards are full was just unacceptable,” says the Rev. Ron Burcham, Risen Savior Lutheran Church and School senior pastor. “We also knew that as individuals, we could make a difference, but if we pooled our resources and asked for God’s blessing we could have a substantial impact.”

The program began the first week after Easter and concluded Sunday, May 18. In conjunction with the drive, Burcham prepared a four-week sermon series about feeding people in need, whether spiritually or through food assistance.

“It was marvelous,” says food drive cochairman Bryan Newman.

The sermon focused on the Miracle of Five Loaves and Two Fish, with a message that not just one person can feed 5,000 people, but together, as a congregation, a huge difference can be made. To make his point and to encourage the congregation to donate, Burcham displayed the collected food on the altar.

“We had people dropping food by the church every day of the week,” he says. “What a privilege to witness the generosity of God’s people and their desire to make a difference in someone else’s life.”

Six members of the congregation gathered after church the last day of the drive to begin counting what was collected.

“It took the six of us five hours to box and move the food outside of the sanctuary to be picked up from the food bank,” says Newman, who added that the food filled one and a half trucks and a van.

He says they collected 8,241 food items that had an estimated value of more than $16,000. The donations weighed 7,244 pounds, which is equivalent to 3.6 tons of food.

“That is enough to provide about 5,660 meals,” Newman says.

More than $1,000 in donations from the congregation was also collected during that four-week food drive.

Risen Savior Lutheran Church and School plans on continuing its services for the community.

“This is the first move in doing that,” Newman says.

The congregation, located at 23914 S. Alma School Rd., has been generating ideas on how to further help the community, including providing turkeys to the food bank.

“I am extremely proud of our congregation,” Burcham says. “They gave freely and generously from their hearts. As a result, they are a blessing to others and in the end it was a blessing for each member as well.”

For more information about the congregation, call (480) 895-6782 or visit http://www.rslcs.org.