I finished . . .

I finished . . .

Today was the big day, the day of my second 5K race.

I woke up feeling good, nerves free and excited to tackle my second race. I’m happy to say I was granted my wish . . .  completely blue skies with temperatures climbing into the 40s by the time the 12 p.m. race began. Although there was sunshine, snow still lined the streets that took us the 3.1 miles. It was pretty running with a blanket of white surrounding us.

Jason took off for work around 8 a.m. kissing me good bye, wishing me good luck and telling me to have fun. After watching him drive away and Lucy letting me know she was ready to go back inside, I felt completely relaxed. I had about 3 hours to kill before I had to get ready. I had some breakfast, and well, I put on my running gear because I was so excited.

The hours started to tick away, leaving only minutes until I had to get everything together. I am happy to say the nerves were still gone. I got Jason’s MP3 player ready with the playlist he made me for my first 5K and then finished putting the last layer of clothing on, before putting on my running belt, and was out the door with a smile on my face.

Today I had to drive myself to the race because Jason was working. It felt good to make that drive. It felt good to be independent. I arrived at the Renaissance Arts Center  and Theatre just a few minutes later and found a parking spot. As I climbed out of the car I saw some of the runners stretching, others doing short sprints getting their bodies ready for the race.

I checked my phone one last time before I zipped my running belt close to after the race. I had a good luck message from my mom. I was ready.

There were only 63 runners for the KingsportARTS Paint the Town 5k. The runners ranged in age from youngsters to older men and women. There was even a cute puppy that joined its owner in the race. (I wish I knew, I would have brought Lucy with me. She definitely would have helped with the outcome.)

The same feeling consumed me. The same feeling of “you did this by yourself, be proud.” I stood amongst friends chatting with each other and family members getting each other ready for the race.

IMG_20150227_142550

I stood behind a few rows of people from the starting line. After a brief message from the organizer of the race, the countdown began for the race to begin.

As the clock struck 12, the runners in front of me picked up their feet and before I knew it I was doing the same thing.

I don’t know if it was the excitement that I was finally running or the adrenaline you get when you’re around other runners, but my speed was pretty fast as we started running on Yadkin Street on the left side of the Renaissance Arts Center and Theatre. I started to slow down my speed once we turned onto Oak Street. As I rounded Forest Street I felt as if I had my stride in check. It must have been a pretty slow stride because a lot of other runners were passing me.

With that said, I felt good. I was outdoors, the sun was shining and I was listening to some great music.

As we made our way to Myrtle Street my body was telling me to slow down. I slowed down to my first walk of the race.

The 17 days of not running caught up with me. The 4 to 5 miles my body got used to running on a weekly basis was no longer the case. I had to listen to my body. I picked my speed back up and then got hit with a hill on Catawba Street and got slowed down to a walk once again.

By this point I was giving myself pep talks.

24ab9a7d18acd1d442df52f78a93dacd

I managed to pick up my speed once again and ran almost the entire distance of Center Street before my body couldn’t take the hill anymore.

The route took us along the same roads until we hit Oak Street to make our way back to the beginning point on Yadkin Street.

Unfortunately Oak Street was where I had a mishap. The cop who was standing at this point was talking to someone and didn’t see me go by to direct me down this street instead of continuing along the same route we took the lap before. Fortunately I had a feeling something was wrong and decided to turn around. I rounded the corner onto Oak Street and saw the finish line in the distance.

I crossed the finish line two minutes past my first race’s time. I was hoping I would beat my last time.

Today’s race had its ups and downs. I was frustrated and a little disappointed by the time the race was over. After I grabbed some water and a banana I looked at my phone and saw a message from Jason nine minutes before the race began “Good luck baby, I love you.” That made me smile before I shared “Well good news is I finished.” His response, “All that matters.”

After I left and returned home I became emotional. I became emotional because I know what I am capable of and I didn’t meet my own expectations . . . to finish the race without any walking.

18794d4ea330bc3dbb941fbfeb9d69ef

Nearly all runners know the voice in their heads that tells them to back off when the going gets tough. Part of training is to help you get better at ignoring this voice and continuing to push even though the voice gets louder and louder as you get more and more fatigued . . . Don’t hope that the race feels easy. Expect it to be hard and know that you’re going to have to repeatedly challenge yourself to ignore the voice in your head that wants you to slow down.

After talking with Jason later this afternoon it really hit home when he told me how proud he was of me.

Bottom line, I ran in a race today. Yes it wasn’t a pretty race. Yes I struggled more than I like to admit. But I finished the race 34th out of 63, 15th out of 36 overall female and 7th out of 12 in my age group for women.

ff77a8985acbe47b50d9affb1bc89a75

The lesson learned today . . . even if it’s a 5K you still need to train. The bigger lesson . . . I’m not ready to run races in the winter. A very unpredictable winter. A winter that started off manageable turned into a frigid cold February. The only thing that kept me from training for 17 days was the bitter cold, below freezing temperatures, and the snow and ice on the ground. When you no longer have a gym membership to run on the treadmill you rely on the forecast for outdoor running.

With that said, I ran today despite the long time of no training.

The good news . . . Jason lifted my spirits. His words made me cry, yes the good tears. Then later today text messages back and forth from my mom started the water works again. Sometimes you just need to get out of your own thoughts and listen to other people’s words. Words you were telling yourself, but having a hard time believing.

We definitely are our own worst critics. But once we get out of our thoughts, it’s amazing how much positive energy runs through your body again.

I’m happy to say I have already found my next race, a race in May. Yes, May when I know the temperatures should be bearable and the training should be limitless.

Today’s experience did not detour me, but gave me the determination to run another one.

Race #2!!

Race #2!!

I have been worried about my Saturday, Feb. 28 race all month long because of the frigid temperatures and the tons of snow we have had throughout February.

Unfortunately, the second week of February was the last time I laced up my running shoes and went for a run. This of course adds to the worry because I haven’t been out there running, practicing, training, getting ready for my second race.

I guess this is what happens when you cancel a gym membership and live in a state that although does not get a ton of snow, has the potential of having a white winter.

It’s been pretty downhill since last Monday when the first true snow storm blew through and the snow has remained on the ground since.

I read on the local news website this morning that the Tri-Cities area has had 15.5″ of snow, breaking the season average of 13.3″ inches.  This is why I haven’t been running . . .

With all of this said, I traveled to the Renaissance Center here in Kingsport this afternoon to pick up my race packet for the KingsportARTS Paint the Town 5K.

IMG_20150227_142550It wasn’t until I walked out the door that the excitement for tomorrow completely consumed me. I left the worry at the door . . . I signed up for the race and I will brave the elements, whatever they may be tomorrow afternoon.

I just wish Jason didn’t have to work. It was comforting last time knowing he was on the sidelines waiting for me to cross the finish line.

I’m not nervous for this race, like I was for my first one Thanksgiving morning. I’m more excited that I have the opportunity to run!!! I’m going on a 17 day dry spell and it’s eating me alive!!

The sun has been shinning for the majority of the afternoon, hopefully melting some of the snow. Tomorrow’s forecast, a high near 39 degrees!!! Whooohooo above freezing!!!

 

BMA moves ahead to allow beer sampling

BMA moves ahead to allow beer sampling

Published in Herald & Tribune Feb. 18, 2015 issue

The Board of Mayor and Aldermen approved the first reading of a beer ordinance amendment that, if approved on the final reading, will allow customers to sample draft craft beers before purchasing from a convenience store or market.

The ordinance, Town Administrator Bob Browning said, will allow anyone selling draft craft beers the opportunity to obtain a permit.

The ordinance requires a $100 nonrefundable application fee for the off-premise retail sale beer permit, as well as an annual privilege tax of $100 to renew the permit.

According to the ordinance, the samples can be no more than 2 ounces in no more than a 5-ounce cup.

Only three 2-ounce samples can be provided during a 24-hour period from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Saturday and from noon to 10 p.m. on Sunday.

The ordinance also states that every customer will have to provide a photo ID to ensure he or she is 21 years old.

The customer’s name, according to the ID, will then be entered into a sampling log that will show the day and time the sample was provided to that person.

All samples are to be consumed on premise and the server providing the samples must have an Alcoholic Beverage Commission server’s license.

The ordinance also states that the Jonesborough Police Department will review the sampling procedure before the convenience store or market begins offering samples.

Town Attorney Jim Wheeler said a few changes needed to be made before the second reading of the amendment.

He said the term “craft beer” needs to be defined, as well as “convenience store” and “market.”

Wheeler said the ordinance also needs to make clear that only three 2-ounce samples can be given to an individual within a 24-hour period.

He also said it must clearly state that it is mandatory that an ABC server must serve all the samples.

“We need to remember that any time we change a beer ordinance, we are asking our police department to enforce that,” Wheeler said.

“So, it has to be very specific and can’t leave it open to subject to interpretation.”

Mayor Kelly Wolfe said an amendment to the beer ordinance is under consideration because of a request that was brought forth by Roadrunner Markets.

“They have inside this structure a Chuggernaut where you can actually buy craft beers in a growler,” he said.

Growlers are large glass jugs traditionally used to transport beer.

“Quite honestly, I can see the value of that because it is hard to say I like something and why spend the money on it if you don’t know how it tastes and you never had it before,” Wolfe said.

Although the first reading passed with a 3-1 vote during the Monday, Feb. 9, meeting, areas of concern were voiced by the aldermen.

“I’ve been giving some thought about this,” Alderman Adam Dickson said.

“I think I feel fairly confident about my decision. I choose to vote against this.”

He said he has the utmost respect for Ryan Broyles, president and CEO of Mountain Empire Oil Company.

“I hope that my vote won’t be taken out of context,” Dickson said. “I really have some concerns in particular about the fact that this is a place where I frequent fairly regularly at the Roadrunner and I do see a lot of children coming in and out. I value the feelings of our chief and I know that the staff at Mountain Empire Oil and the Roadrunner store will do an excellent job and will abide by the rules. I just have some personal concerns.”

Wolfe told Dickson he understood where he was coming from, but right now Jonesborough’s liquor stores have the options of doing tastings.

“We have Depot Street Brewery (who) obviously has a license as a manufacturer in town and a license to allow them to have samples there. Currently, beer is sold in every convenience store just about in Jonesborough, if not all of them. Really, the only difference would be that sampling option,” Wolfe said. “Right now that beer at the Chuggernaut is on tap. They are actively filling those growlers right there. I have purchased a couple of them. It is a nice option and it is a matter of personal preference.”

He said if there is abuse, there are ramifications.

“I think we have a track record of mixed drinks being served in town now very successfully,” Wolfe said. “You are seeing people in Jonesborough take time in doing it right.”

Operations Manager Craig Ford said he can talk with the City of Greeneville’s Police Department and see if they have had any issues with beer samples since implementing their ordinance.

Browning said any of the restaurants that have liquor by the drink can provide samples to their customers if they choose. He said when Tennessee Hills Distillery becomes operational, you can have a family in there and have tastings.

“There is not an age limit to go into the distillery,” Browning said.

Alderman Terry Countermine said although he is a beer drinker, he is a little concerned about drawing 2 ounces of draft beer.

“The idea is that I am drinking it there to decide if I want to buy,” he asked. “I have concerns about the abuse of that.”

Wolfe said the idea is that an individual would be trying three different samples, rather than three of the same.

“One drink you should be able to say I like that one or not,” he said.

Discussion was also had about what the blood alcohol concentration would be after consumption.

Police Chief Matt Hawkins said although many factors, such as muscle mass and body weight, can sway the number drastically in either way, generally the blood alcohol level is at .05 after two 12-ounce beers.

 

Lucy’s first snow experience

Lucy’s first snow experience

Yesterday, Feb. 16, Kingsport received its first good snow this winter as Winter Storm Octavia crossed our region. It started snowing yesterday morning and remained pretty consistent into the evening after the sun went down.

There were numerous times throughout the day that the falling snowflakes caught my attention, distracting me from working on my articles at my desk.

The best part of the storm has been watching Lucy, our year-old puppy, try to figure out what’s going on. She doesn’t quite understand that she can go to the bathroom on top of the snow. She’s been desperately looking for her grass.

IMG_2899 edit

So here’s last night’s snowy conditions through Lucy’s eyes . . .

IMG_2908 edit

IMG_2915 edit

Lucy’s paw prints . . . IMG_2922 editBefore the sun went down they closed off our road right in front of the house to the left of us. It was probably for the best, it gets pretty windy after our driveway.

IMG_2920 editJason, Lucy and I walked down the road, so I could take a few pictures, which of course was after Lucy ran around the backyard in the snow.

The result . . . priceless . . .

IMG_2923 editLucy snuggled on Jason’s chest fast asleep.

This morning after Lucy and I woke up we ventured back outside into a little deeper snow. Our poor little girl didn’t quite know what to do. Every step she took, she sunk covering her belly in snow and covering her poor paws. She instantly went to all the corners of our property where she normally goes to the bathroom and couldn’t find the grass.

Again . . . here is our snowy morning through Lucy’s eyes . . . .

IMG_2928 edit

IMG_2944 edit

Lucy snow on nose edit

IMG_2957 editWe came inside and I bundled her up near our little space heater where she fell fast asleep.

Here are a few more snow pictures from around our house.

IMG_2900 edit

IMG_2902 edit

IMG_2914 edit

IMG_2952 edit

IMG_2930 edit

IMG_2956 edit

IMG_2910 editI would guess we got between 5 to 7 inches yesterday. Hopefully we can make a snowman later when Jason gets home.

Bitter cold and gloomy

Bitter cold and gloomy

This is my second year experiencing the winter months in Tennessee and I have to admit I still have not become used to the bitter cold and gloomy days.

20150115_145908

It’s a love, hate type of relationship. I love living in a state that has four seasons, but I hate how the sun disappears for months at a time during the winter.

I miss the sunshine. I miss not having to put layer upon layer on before heading outside. Most of all, I miss wearing flip-flops where ever I go. Yep, I blame that on Florida. It was rare you would find me in any other shoes but sandals.

It’s only the third week of January. Still quite a few days left until the spring arrives.

I tell Jason all the time, the cold temperatures would not be that bad if we had something to show for it, like snow. We have not had any snow on the ground so far this winter.

The good thing about this winter is the temperatures haven’t been all that bad. Well until January hit. Although I can handle cooler temperatures this year, my body still has not accepted temperatures 20 degrees and below quite yet.

I remember having major cabin fever last winter. I won’t say I was depressed by any means, but my mood was all over the place because of the dreary days. Jason and I went from constantly being outside – walking, hiking – to being stuck indoors.

This year, in an effort to nip those feelings in the butt, I have taken to exercising outside. It helps that I have a puppy now that needs to go outside every few hours.

I quit going to the gym in September because I fell in love with running outdoors. I no longer liked being stuck within the confinement of gym walls.

Weather permitting, I have gone for a run at least two or three times a week since the cold winter temperatures began. Some of those runs were in temperatures I never thought I would attempt.

With all of that said, I am having a hard time getting motivated to face the bitter cold dreary days to go for a run. It’s kind of discouraging because I achieved a new distance on Sunday.

Every morning I have woke with the excitement of going for a run, surpassing my latest distance, but then walking outside slowly diminishes that thought.

I hope the motivation returns tomorrow. I know that fresh air, even cold air, will do me some good after a hectic week of writing and meeting deadlines.

“The sun’ll come out tomorrow” . . . .

“Embracing heritage”

Distillery ready to open in new year

Published in Herald & Tribune Dec. 24, 2014 issue

As of last week, Tennessee Hills Distillery can officially manufacture and distribute alcohol in the state of Tennessee, bringing the Jonesborough business one step closer to opening the doors early next year.

“I can’t believe it still,” Stephen Callahan, owner of Tennessee Hills Distillery, said of making progress in following his dreams and his moonshine roots. “Now we have to get our labels approved and wait on our first shipment of bottles and get our souvenir line in order.”

He hopes to open the doors if not by the middle of January, definitely by Feb. 1.

“I want to get the doors open, but want to make sure we can operate in a safe and efficient manner,” Callahan said.

The process of opening the distillery, which began in early 2014, has been steadily moving along. Callahan and his brother, David, have been working side-by-side turning the Salt House into the new home for the Tennessee Hills Distillery applying the business’ motto “embracing heritage” every step of the way.

“We built the stills in house, did renovations in the building specific to our needs. My brother and I did the iron gates, the tasting bar, the glass walls,” Callahan said. “Every piece of equipment, my brother and I fabricated in there.”

All the equipment needed to operate the business is now in the building.

The 300-gallon and 150-gallon copper stills were designed by Callahan.

“We built those in the Salt House pretty much right where they are sitting. I think that speaks a lot for our craftsmanship. We want equipment that is a work of art rather than just serving its purpose to make liquor,” he said. “We are really passionate about what we do. We want to get people a product made with passion and very high quality too.”

The still gives Callahan a wide range in terms of the product that can be made at the Salt House. He said he can make corn liquor that has a lot of flavor to vodka that has no flavor.

“We have a lot of versatility in the Salt House as far as the product,” he said, adding that everything will be made in small batches and hand-bottled.

The tasting bar was pieced together with chestnut that came from an old family barn that was more than a 150 years old.

“It was in really good condition in the barn,” he said. “I figured it would be a perfect place to put it on display.”

Callahan said the distillery is going to be a nice place to stop in, take a tour, have some tastings and hopefully buy a bottle of whiskey.

The outside of the building has also been enhanced with shrubs and a crosswalk. The loading dock, weather permitting, should be installed early next week.

“Jonesborough has been behind us 100 percent from the time I came to town and pitched my idea,” he said. “They helped us put in the crosswalks and have a nice venue.”

In addition to getting the Salt House ready for business, Callahan said they have already harvested crops for the operation. Eighty-eight acres or about 10,000 bushels of corn, were harvested from Callahan’s family farm in November and stored in a silo at Shell Mill in Jonesborough.

“That should last us hopefully for three quarters of the year, maybe the first full year,” he said.

Callahan said everything they are doing will be ground in an antique 1940s model stone mill because it adds to their businesses story.

“That’s pretty special,” he said. “We gave him (Mark Shell) a whole new business aspect. We are going to be using a lot of corn.”

Callahan said when crops are stone ground, they tend to keep a lot of their flavor profile.

The grains that are leftover, will feed the livestock on Callahan’s 100-acre family farm. He said they are getting ready to buy some more cattle to consume the access grain.

“It’s all going to be pretty personal and full circle,” he said of the process. “Everything is pretty much in Jonesborough and that’s how I like to keep it.”

He said they are waiting on barley to be delivered, which should arrive at any time.

The business will have a quick turnaround for their product due to grains being delivered to the Salt House every seven to 10 days.

Callahan said hopefully by March or April, they will have all of the flavors produced that are going to be released and available at the Salt House.

Callahan said he believes his business will be very well received once the doors are open.

“Our story, being from the oldest town, and being in a 174 year old building, and kind of preserving a historical site, and making it a functional historical building, is special to me,” he said. “That is being a part of history.”


Other articles about the distillery I’ve written:

January 2014

Distillery coming to Jonesborough?

https://meghan80.wordpress.com/2014/01/21/distillery-coming-to-jonesborough/

Proposed distillery gets planning comission OK

https://meghan80.wordpress.com/2014/01/29/a-made-with-love-distilling-company/


February 2014

With one ‘no’ vote cast . . . Future downtown distillery clears next hurdle

https://meghan80.wordpress.com/2014/02/20/an-authentic-tennessee-moonshine-distillery/?relatedposts_hit=1&relatedposts_origin=3630&relatedposts_position=0


March 2014

Board gives distillery final approval

https://meghan80.wordpress.com/2014/04/02/its-a-huge-victory/


“It’s not for kids”

Park Proposals

Community meets to discuss land possibility near new senior center

Published in Herald & Tribune Dec. 10, 2014 issue

Although some members of the community voiced their concerns about the proposed park behind the new Senior Center being opened to everyone, including children, others at last week’s workshop wanted to incorporate elements that they could enjoy with their grandchildren.

“This is a community input meeting. It’s an opportunity for people within the community to give us ideas,” Town Administrator Bob Browning told the crowd of about 20 people that gathered Dec. 4 at the Historic Jonesborough Visitors Center.

The Community Design Assistance Center out of Virginia Tech led the session, which began with a power point presentation before splitting into two smaller groups to give individuals an opportunity to have discussions of what they would like to see at the park.

“Although I cannot give you a timetable on it,” Browning said of when the park would be completed, “It is our intention to change the area behind the new Senior Center building where our municipal garage is currently located.”

That space, Browning said, is approximately 3 acres, with some of the acreage being incorporated into parking for the Senior Center.

“We are in the process of developing an acquisition of property at the west end of town that we are going to try to move to. But in the meantime, we also wanted to plan for what happens when we leave that space,” Browning said. “We feel like we owe it to the neighborhood and the new Senior Center to develop a really nice park area or something that would be an asset to that community around there.”

The presentation showed such ideas as multi-use trails, different kinds of seating, various structures, games, shaded areas, water features, outdoor performing space, area for outdoor classes and plants that would attract birds and butterflies.

During the presentation, some members of the audience asked if the proposed park was a community park or a senior park.

“All of these pictures you are showing have children on them,” Stacy Rush, a Senior Center Advisory Board member, said of the slideshow presentation.

Rush said the way he understood the paper, was that the park would not be for children, it would be for seniors only.

Lead Landscape Designer Jen Jessup said they are starting off as a community park because that is how they generate ideas. She said if they see that the park is mostly going to be seniors utilizing the space based on everyone’s input, then it will be more of a senior park.

“But we have not got to those stages yet to call it a senior park,” she said. “We are trying to be all inclusive to the neighborhoods surrounding it and trying to get an idea of what the needs of the park are. If the needs of the park are to be a senior park, and strictly a senior park, that will be one of the concepts.”

Once the crowd broke into two smaller groups, they had an opportunity to write down what they wanted to see at the park, which was then displayed for everyone to see.

Such ideas as walking trails, shaded areas, pavilions, water features, restrooms, raised garden beds, places for children to play, swings for sitting and benches with backs, grilling area and a lending library were among some of the ideas.

After Community Design Assistance Center Director Elizabeth Gilboy asked her group if they wanted to bring their grandchildren to the park, a discussion broke out. Many of the members of the group agreed that the park should be used only by senior citizens, which did not sit well with one member of the group, who collected her belongings and left.

Rush said if the space is turned over to allow children to play at the park, senior citizens are going to get run over and possibly knocked down.

Rush said if you put a teeter totter in, the kids will come.

“I haven’t been working this whole time to put in a children’s park,” he said. “We may not be able to put a sign up, but people need to know ahead of time, it’s not for kids.”

Carol Jernigan, who was a registered parish nurse at the Senior Center, said although some members of the community voiced their concerns about the park being used by children, she did not have any trouble with children accessing the space. Jernigan said she does, however, understand why they would like it geared toward a certain age.

“As a population, I don’t think they are anxious to mingle,” she said.

Rush said he would like to see such elements as a shuffle board area, restrooms and places to sit, preferable benches with backs.

Jernigan said she attended the meeting because she has been interested in seeing the Senior Center have a raised garden bed. She said it would be nice to bring seniors together in an outside setting.

“There is plenty of need for fresh food and fresh vegetables,” she said, adding that senior citizens are always looking for inexpensive food opportunities.

Jernigan said she thinks the park is a great idea because it would create a stopping place with extended walkways through town for gathering and recreation.

The ideas from Thursday night’s meeting will be made into two conceptual designs and brought back to the community at the end of January 2015. From there, feedback and comments will be taken into consideration and brought back to the community in March.