Win a boat while helping WWA

The Wounded Warrior Anglers of America, Inc. are raffling another boat, courtesy of Fort Myers Marine Owner Chuck Calkins, this year to raise funds for their nonprofit organization.

2014 NauticStar 2110 Sport Bay with 115hp Yamaha four-stroke & trailer

2014 NauticStar 2110 Sport Bay with 115hp Yamaha four-stroke & trailer

The 21-foot boat is a 2014, NauticStar 2110 Sport Bay with a 115 horse power Yamaha F115 with a 92-inch beam. It also has a magic tilt trailer and such added features as stainless steel props, 7×7 bow seat base, swim platform with a ladder, single battery switch and two gunnel rod holders.

The boat, motor and trailer packages is valued at approximately  $39,627.

Individuals can view the Sport Bay NauticStar and purchase raffle tickets during the Fort Myers Boat Show from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thu., Nov. 14, Fri., Nov. 15, Sat., Nov. 16 and Sun., Nov. 17 at Harborside Event Center, 1375 Monroe St., Fort Myers. The boat will be located in the Fort Myers Marine tent and wounded warriors will be volunteering and talking to people during the show.

Three thousand tickets were printed for the raffle, which are $20 a piece or six for $100. The raffle tickets can be purchased online at www.woundedwarrioranglers.org or by calling Judy Souders, vice president of Wounded Warrior Anglers, at 423-620-9104.

The winner of the boat raffle will be announced no later than May 26, 2014 at the Olde Fish House Marina, 4350 Pine Island Rd., Matlacha, Florida. The winner need not be present to win. The winner is responsible for the tag, title, delivery, dealer prep, registration and all applicable taxes.

“This is our largest fundraiser that pairs with the tournament on Memorial Day weekend,” Souders said of the Original Redfish Poker Fishing Championship. “This is how we raise funds to provide the Wounded Warrior and Caregiver Retreat for warriors, caregivers, spouses and children.”

The organization holds four large retreats for wounded warriors and their caregivers each year. Wounded Warrior Anglers helps its warriors by taking them out on the water for a day of fishing, which promotes a friendly and peaceful environment to help warriors heal. They also help the warrior’s caregivers by treating them to a day of relaxation at Spa 33 in Matlacha.

Purchase a raffle ticket and help support this organization that is doing so much for our warriors and caregivers.

Last year, the 5013c organization raffled off an 18-foot NauticStar, 1810 Nautic Bay boat.

Check out the other blogs I have written about the organization: https://meghan80.wordpress.com/wounded-warrior-anglers-of-america-inc/

 

Meet the WWA board of directors

battle of matlacha

In June of this year, I had the privilege of joining six other board members for the organization, Wounded Warrior Anglers of America, Inc.

I, Meghan McCoy, was first introduced to the organization on Father’s Day in 2012 while covering the Save Our Servicemembers (S.O.S.) event for the Pine Island Eagle. I remember sitting at a picnic table at the Olde Fish House Marina interviewing Dave after he finished speaking at the event. His passion for this organization got me, he truly wanted to help others.

From that moment on, Dave, Judy and I formed an incredible friendship. As I continued to write articles about the organization for the Pine Island Eagle, my love and interest for what they did grew. I was constantly being touched.

This organization has given me the opportunity to thank our service men and women, as well as their caregivers with the simple gesture of shaking their hand or speaking the words thank you.

The excerpt below was taken from another blog I have written, something that I think about often.

The moments I shared with Angel, who served in the Army for 26 ½ years, tugged at my heart. As we sat there, he shared a few stories of when he was deployed, which truly meant a lot to me.

Before I said goodbye, I thanked him. He instantly asked what did I do? I said you served our country and fought for our freedom. The emotion he shared at that moment will be a part of me forever. It still gives me goose bumps as I sit and write about it now. These men and women who join the service do not do it anticipating a thank you from us civilians, but rather because something called them to that job.

The honesty in Angel’s eyes touched me in a way I cannot explain. I told him just know that you are appreciated before I shook his hand once again.

Wounded Warrior Anglers is an incredible organization that “help rehabilitate the mind, body and soul of all service members who have been injured, wounded or disabled in the line of duty no matter what their era of service.”

This organization, which was founded in 2012 by Dave, president, and his wife Judy, vice president, has grown leaps and bounds since its inception. That growth happened with the help of many dedicated individuals who all want to make a difference in our wounded warrior lives, as well as their caregivers.

Tate Hutchinson, Treasurer 

Tate Hutchinson, Judy and Dave’s son, is a founding board member . He is an industrial mechanic who lives in Martinsburg, WV who loves to fish. He was in the Army for two years with the 82nd AirBorn.

“I bring my experience of the military service and my love of fishing in hope to accomplish healing the souls of our military men and women for all they have given to our country and its freedom,” Tate said. “We are trying to help heal and give back to our soldiers for all that they have sacrificed for our country. In my opinion, this is one of the most important organizations in our country helping our veterans.”

Marlene Randolph

Marlene Randolph is another founding board member of Wounded Warrior Anglers. She became a member after Dave and Judy asked her help make their idea come to fruition of helping soldiers when they come home.

“Let them know we appreciate their sacrifice and help them find some peace in the normal,” Marlene said.

Marlene lives in Tennessee where she is the owner of ServiceMaster of Greeneville, TN and The Handy Man in Afton, TN.

Lisa Dence

Lisa Dence decided to become a member of the board after a benefit was held at the Olde Fish House Marina, where her and her husband are managers, in June 2012. She moved to Southwest Florida from upstate New York in August 2002.

“I met David and Judy and knew this was an orgnaization I would want our business to support,” Lisa said, adding that Dave asked her to become a board member in 2012. “I am honored to be a part of Wounded Warrior Anglers. David and Judy are amazing people that truly are about making a difference.”

Lisa provides the organization with property in Matlacha, FL – a marina, water access for captains for their boats, as well as open air seating where the wounded warriors and caregivers gather at the end of fishing and spa retreats. She said she also offers the understanding of how important it is to help these wounded warriors through this very stressful time.

“My goal is to make a difference and lasting positive memory even if it is only for a day to let them know that they are not forgotten and how grateful we are for their sacrifice and service,” Lisa said.

Kevin Santos

Kevin Santos, who became a part of the organization in March 2013, enlisted in the Army in 1985.

“I met Dave at a PTSD group at the VA Clinic in June of 2012, I had never heard of his organization and as he was telling me about it, his face was lit with joy,” Kevin said. “I decided to go fishing with him and we had a great time. I have since spent a lot of time volunteering to help him with whatever he needed. We became good friends.”

Kevin believed he could still help the organization more, so he asked Dave if there was anything else he could do, which granted him a member of the board of directors.

The school Kevin had signed up for had been canceled and he was sent home in the late 80s. He returned approximately seven months later to continue school as a concrete mobile mixer operator. Kevin graduated and was selected to attend Ranger school and was later recruited by the special operations command and sent to SFAS.

“In 1986, I graduated from SFAS and was assigned to the 10th Special Forces unit at Ft. Devens in Massachusetts. I spent six years with 10th group and was deployed to Libya, Guatemala, Honduras, Panama and Iraq,” Kevin shared. “I returned from Iraq in 1991 and was assigned to a special task force to train members of the other branches of the military in repelling and close quarters combat.”

Unfortunately Kevin fell from a 60 foot repelling tower and was paralyzed for four years, spent two additional years in a wheel chair before walking with crutches and a cane for two more years.

In 1999, he joined the National Guard and trained as a medic and was stationed in San Antonio and Wyoming for a total of two years. In 2002, he returned to active duty and did another tour in Iraq, then Korea before joining the 101st and did two more tours in Iraq. Kevin finally retired in October 2007 and moved to Cape Coral, FL.

Kevin brings a great deal of ideas to the organization, which he explains are sometimes so far out of the box they have their own zip code.

“I would like to see the organization become a national organization and have members in every state in the U.S. and be able to do more for their veterans and their caregivers,” Kevin said.

The organization stands out for Kevin and is like no other veteran organization because it has a lot of younger veterans involved. He said Wounded Warrior Anglers also includes the caregivers in many activities and retreats, which he also enjoys.

“I feel that just by being around other veterans and going out to go fishing or hunting or just doing something with them, I have improved my life,” Kevin said. “I am getting better at coping with stress and my PTSD just because I know that nothing will ever happen that will spark a relapse or a flashback while I am with them, they have my back and I have theirs.”

John Lynch

John Lynch, a lieutenant with the Cape Coral Fire Department, became a board member four months ago. The Matlacha resident fishes almost every single day that he is home off of his dock.

“I was having lunch at the Olde Fish House and overheard Judy and David Souders setting up their first fundraiser and introduced myself,” John said. “I thought Tammey and Nadine at Spa 33 might help out with the wives, girlfriends and caregivers. It’s the best way I thought we could help. Tammey and Nadine loved the idea and really ran with it.”

(Note: The Wounded Warrior Anglers offer a Warrior and Caregiver Retreat throughout the year. Warriors are treated to a day out on the water fishing, thanks to the generosity of captains and their boats. The caregivers are also treated at Spa 33 in Matlacha with a day of pampering – manicure, facials, massages, make-up and their hair styled)

John said he would like to help Wounded Warrior Anglers grow and touch as many returning wounded warriors as possible. He said it stands out as a local, home-grown, small organization that David and Judy started to provide a positive experience for our returning service men and women.

“What I bring to this organization is a tiny thank you for the sacrifice, service and dedication that these men and women and their families have provided for protecting our nation and its freedoms,” John said.

Tony Rogers

Tony Rogers purchased a home more than two years ago and made the area near Matlacha on the water his permanent home in June 2012.

He served as a federal immigration judge in Dallas, TX for more than 17 years until he retired in 2010. Tony is also a retired Army Colonel. He served as an infantry officer and combat aviator during the Vietnam War. After law school,  he served as a judge advocate and military judge for the duration of his career. His career also includes serving as a professor at law schools, as well as on the faculty of the National Judicial College.

“I ran into Dave and Judy at Publix shortly after moving here and the ‘Army Ranger’ sticker on the back on my SUV got Dave’s attention and we began talking about Wounded Warrior Anglers,” Tony said. “I participated in the first event and was the guy who was out fished by a 13-year-old.”

(Note: Tony donated his time and boat as a volunteer captain to take the wounded warriors out on the water during a retreat.)

Shortly after participating in that event he was asked if he would like to become a board member.

“I enjoy the opportunity to interact with the warriors and to give them a positive experience. As a combat veteran from Vietnam, I served as an infantry officer and pilot. I know something of what these folks bring home with them and the nation was not as welcoming in my era, so I am happy to provide a better experience. The guys I have taken out have a wide range of challenges including extensive TBI, amputations and early onset dementia relating to IED’s.”

Tony said overall his participation with the organization has been a rewarding experience.

“I think I get more out of it than the folks I take out,” he said. “We seldom talk about war or combat, which might surprise the casual observer, but our focus is on fishing and relaxation.”

Heartwarming experience

What an emotional, gratifying, heartwarming, special, spectacular day yesterday.

Men and women were invited to Matlacha this past weekend to take part in the Warrior and Caregiver Retreat, two days put on by Wounded Warrior Anglers to treat the warriors and caregivers to a stress free day.

Friday night kicked off with a captain’s dinner at Miceli’s Restaurant in Matlacha to provide the warriors and caregivers with the opportunity to meet the men who were taking them out on the water the following day. As everyone gathered around the table and enjoyed pizza, new friendships were formed. Conversations were had, laughter was shared and life long memories were created.

It’s truly amazing to witness how complete strangers turn into instant friends in a matter of minutes for the simple reason of them sharing a common experience – serving in the military.

Saturday morning I arrived at the Olde Fish House Marina minutes before a presentation was had by Tim, who is a part of Bimimi Bay Outfitters. He presented the warriors with rods and reels. The night before the warriors received sunglasses for their fishing trip.

Dave Souders, co-founder of Wounded Warrior Anglers, said the rod and reel is a tool for their own therapy, so they can continue to fish beyond the day of the retreat.

As all the warriors were called upon to receive their rod and reel the excitement of fishing began to fill the space.

Once completed, the captains and warriors filled one of eight boats that were stocked with what they needed. Their spouses, or significant others, kissed them goodbye and sent them on their way wishing a great day of fishing.

As everyone became settled the engines were turned on and the boats departed one at a time. The smiles and glows that filled these warrior’s faces were priceless. The captains also shared the same excitement.

The amazing part of that moment, is all of these captains donated their time and boats Saturday because they all believe in the organization’s cause.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAGeorge who joined the festivities for the first time Saturday, as a captain, said the experience of taking the warriors out on the boat was “awesome.” He instantly became hooked and is looking forward to the next retreat.

As George sat there and shared stories of their day out on the water, a permanent smile remained on his face as he shared how excited Paul, one of the warriors on his boat, was the entire time they were fishing. Although Jim, another warrior that was aboard the boat, goes fishing quite often, George said Jim shared that it was the best day he has had on the water since October.

Those reasons alone are what captures the beauty of what the organization is all about. These generous captains created a stress free day for these warriors who battle with so many injuries and PTSD. Because of these captains, these men and women who fought for our freedom and served our country, forget about their worries while focusing on catching fish after fish.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAA short time after they left the docks, five caregivers and Dave’s wife, Judy, also a co-founder of the organization, walked to Spa 33 for their day of relaxation.

Nadine and Tammey, owners of Spa 33 in Matlacha, close their business for the day to treat caregivers to a manicure, facial, massage, make-up, as well as a having their hair styled. These owners wanted to take care of these caregivers because they take care of the warriors who kept us safe. They shared that so many times when women are taking care of their loved ones they often times forget to take care of themselves.

The day, I believe was just as touching to Nadine and Tammey, as well as the rest of their staff, as it was to all of the caregivers. What huge hearts these women have. Once again because of their generosity, life long memories were created as some of the women experienced massages for the first time.

Again, these women who met for the first time this weekend shared an instant connection, which sparked nonstop conversations of their husbands, and boyfriend, as well as the experiences they had when they were deployed.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIt was such a positive environment that had continuous laughter as the women one-by-one became more relaxed as they were treated to personalize pampering.

The word “thank you” was shared more than once as the afternoon began to sink in for these caregivers.

Although a day of pampering was had, Danielle said she enjoyed the conversation the most.

“The conversation was my favorite,” she said. “I’m talking to adults and not kids.”

Many of the women expressed that they were more excited about their husband and boyfriend being out on the water fishing. They all said it was good for them because many times they do not share the experiences they had while in the service.

This is the second time I have spent the day with the men and women who were brought in from either Lee County, Collier County or other areas of Florida for the retreat. The day pulls on my heart as I witness just how much the day means to them . . . how as the day goes on they become more relaxed and their daily worries disappear.

I am so fortunate to be a part of such a wonderful organization that truly helps others. I am also honored to have been asked to serve on their board.

battle of matlachaThe conversations I had with these men and women will stay with me forever, especially one I had after the men returned from their fishing trip.

The moments I shared with Angel, who served in the Army for 26 ½ years, tugged at my heart. As we sat there, he shared a few stories of when he was deployed, which truly meant a lot to me.

Before I said goodbye, I thanked him. He instantly asked what did I do? I said you served our country and fought for our freedom. The emotion he shared at that moment will be a part of me forever. It still gives me goose bumps as I sit and write about it now. These men and women who join the service do not do it anticipating a thank you from us civilians, but rather because something called them to that job.

The honesty in Angel’s eyes touched me in a way I cannot explain. I told him just know that you are appreciated before I shook his hand once again.

Although I will never know what these men and women experienced while they served our country, Wounded Warrior Anglers continously provides me with plenty of opportunities to thank them for what they have done.

Judy and Dave have created something special. Because of this special couple, these men and women’s circle of friends continues to grow, which in itself is a beautiful thing because it is another support system that will be with them forever.